AAA warns of spike in teen crash fatalities during 100 Deadliest Days

EAU CLAIRE, Wis. (WEAU) -- As new and inexperienced drivers get out of school we're entering the deadliest time of the year for teen drivers, so AAA has a word of caution for parents.

AAA released new data showing across the country teens killed in car crashes between the ages of 16-17 increased by around 13% from 2014 to 2015.

The data is even worse for Wisconsin where the increase was even higher at more than 14%.

The study comes we enter "100 Deadliest Days" of driving so AAA says parents should be on high alert.

Eau Claire mother Lesley Frederickson says she has discussed safe driving techniques with her 16-year-old daughter, Maggie Sauls.

Frederickson explained, “When any of us are driving our cars we're driving a lethal weapon and we have to be treating it as such. This is very dangerous anytime we go anywhere so we do talk about it a lot.”

Frederickson also says she uses an online tracker to monitor her daughter’s driving habits, keeping an eye on her speed and quick braking.

Sauls says so far her mom’s supervision has helped her monitor her driving skills.

Sauls added, “I know what's in the balance and that's my life and the life of people around me so I definitely, definitely make sure that I'm being as safe as I can.”

However the Wisconsin State Patrol says Eau Claire County is still seeing a spike in the number of teen driver fatalities; jumping from 34 in 2015 to 46 in 2016.

Lt. Les Mlsna explained, “Teen drivers normally between the ages of 16 and 19 are more prone to speed than other drivers. A lot of times they're not able to make decisions or realize they're in that dangerous situation.”

The state patrol says while newer technology in vehicles has it upsides, like making vehicles safer as well as navigation system that get drivers where they need to go, it has it downsides as well - mainly serving as a distraction.

Lt. Mlsna saix, “Being hands free doesn't necessarily get rid of the distraction because your mind is distracted and taken off of the task of actually driving the vehicle when you're spending it doing something else whether it's just daydreaming, using your phone, listening to a GPS, music or friends in the vehicle.”

The state patrol says from Memorial Day to Labor Day especially parents should talk to their kids about eliminating distractions.
As new and inexperienced drivers get out of school we're entering the deadliest time of the year for teen drivers, so AAA has a word of caution for parents.
AAA released new data showing across the country teens killed in car crashes between the ages of 16-17 increased by around 13% from 2014 to 2015.

The data is even worse for Wisconsin where the increase was even higher at more than 14%.

The study comes we enter "100 Deadliest Days" of driving so AAA says parents should be on high alert.

Eau Claire mother Lesley Frederickson says she has discussed safe driving techniques with her 16-year-old daughter, Maggie Sauls.

Frederickson explained, “When any of us are driving our cars we're driving a lethal weapon and we have to be treating it as such. This is very dangerous anytime we go anywhere so we do talk about it a lot.”

Frederickson also says she uses an online tracker to monitor her daughter’s driving habits, keeping an eye on her speed and quick braking.

Sauls says so far her mom’s supervision has helped her monitor her driving skills.

Sauls added, “I know what's in the balance and that's my life and the life of people around me so I definitely, definitely make sure that I'm being as safe as I can.”

However the Wisconsin State Patrol says Eau Claire County is still seeing a spike in the number of teen driver fatalities; jumping from 34 in 2015 to 46 in 2016.

Lt. Les Mlsna explained, “Teen drivers normally between the ages of 16 and 19 are more prone to speed than other drivers. A lot of times they're not able to make decisions or realize they're in that dangerous situation.”

The state patrol says while newer technology in vehicles has it upsides, like making vehicles safer as well as navigation system that get drivers where they need to go, it has it downsides as well - mainly serving as a distraction.

Lt. Mlsna saix, “Being hands free doesn't necessarily get rid of the distraction because your mind is distracted and taken off of the task of actually driving the vehicle when you're spending it doing something else whether it's just daydreaming, using your phone, listening to a GPS, music or friends in the vehicle.”

The state patrol says from Memorial Day to Labor Day especially parents should talk to their kids about eliminating distractions.

He added, “The real thing is to be focused on what you're supposed to be doing and that's getting safely from point A to point B without all these distractions.”

The state patrol also says males from the ages of 16 to 19 are twice as likely to be involved in a crash but officers say all drivers no matter their age or gender should be paying attention out on the road.

He added, “The real thing is to be focused on what you're supposed to be doing and that's getting safely from point A to point B without all these distractions.”

The state patrol also says males from the ages of 16 to 19 are twice as likely to be involved in a crash but officers say all drivers no matter their age or gender should be paying attention out on the road.



 
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