Wis. police become more aggressive with redaction

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MILWAUKEE (AP) -- More people who get arrested or crash their cars in Wisconsin are having a tougher time getting the full paperwork from police.

Departments across the state are increasingly blacking out names, addresses and other identifying information about people mentioned in their reports. It comes after a federal appeals court ruled last year that divulging the information violates the federal Driver's Privacy Protection Act. That law requires consent before agencies release a driver's personal information.

The decision has left Wisconsin police wary of lawsuits if they release identifying information in crash and incident reports, which often use identifying information gleaned from state vehicle records.

It's unclear how many departments have adopted such redaction policies, but Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association President Steven Riffel says the number is rising every day.




 
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