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Johnson & Johnson COVID Vaccine: local expert breaks down effectiveness

Published: Feb. 10, 2021 at 10:16 PM CST
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MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) -The FDA is weeks away from possibly approving the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine and a local expert breaks down the effectiveness of the shot.

It’s a one stop shot. Studies show the Johnson and Johnson covid vaccine gets the job done in one dosage.

“The goal is to go to these one shot approaches,” Dr. William Hartman, UW-Health Astrazeneca covid vaccine trial principal investigator said.

Hartman studied a similar vaccine at UW-Health, so we took a closer look at the Johnson and Johnson vaccine.

He broke down the difference between the two dose and one dose covid vaccine.

“The first dose kind of teaches your body what it’s supposed to do and the second dose further supports them and really creates the strong immunity,” he said.

He said the one dose vaccine does those steps all at once.

Digging a little deeper into the data: Even though the Johnson and Johnson vaccine is 72 percent protective against getting covid-19, studies show it’s 85 percent effective against preventing severe disease.

Hartman said saving lives is what matters most.

“All of these vaccines are extremely effective against preventing hospitalizations, severe disease and death,” he said.

That prompted the question, what should people be more concerned about?: getting the virus or recovering from it.

“That’s kind of the million-dollar question. It all comes down to where your comfort level is,” Hartman said.

He said it depends on if you’re a part of a vulnerable population, but your best bet is to get vaccinated.

“What they’re aiming for is that the virus can’t attack a person and so people don’t become infected with covid-19,” Hartman said.

The FDA is set to review the Johnson and Johnson covid vaccine on Feb. 24.

The CEO said, if approved, people may need annual covid vaccinations over the next several years, similar to the flu, because the virus can mutate.

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