Republican Dunleavy wins Alaska governor's race

Vote Pin, Photo Date: January 19, 2016 / Photo: U.S. Army / (MGN)
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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the midterm elections (all times local):

4:50 p.m.

Republican Mike Dunleavy has fended off Democrat Mark Begich to win the Alaska governor's race.

Dunleavy cast himself as tough on crime and supported a full payout of the check Alaskans receive from the state's oil-wealth fund, the Alaska Permanent Fund. The payout has been limited since 2016 amid a state budget deficit.

Dunleavy says Alaskans have lost faith in government and have little trust in politicians.

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker, an independent, ended his re-election campaign last month after his lieutenant governor resigned for what Walker described as an inappropriate overture to a woman. Walker said he concluded he could not win against Begich and Dunleavy and said he thought Begich would be better for Alaska than Dunleavy.

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1 p.m.

Montana Democrat Jon Tester has won a third Senate term, beating Republican Matt Rosendale, the state auditor.

President Donald Trump had taken a personal interest in defeating Tester, and had visited the state to campaign against the incumbent. Trump had said he wanted to make Tester pay at the polls for helping detail Trump's first nominee to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Tester is the top Democrat on the Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee.

Tester insisted that Montana voters across the political spectrum would support him after examining his record.

Trump held four rallies in Montana and sent his eldest son and Vice President Mike Pence to headline more appearances. Rosendale also got help from outside cash that poured into the race.

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12 p.m.

There's a winner in the race for Connecticut governor, and it's Democratic businessman Ned Lamont.

The 64-year-old cable TV company founder has prevailed over Republican businessman Bob Stefanowski. Lamont's victory means the seat stays in Democratic hands, with the Democratic incumbent, Dannel Malloy, set to leave office.

Lamont has promised to be a "firewall" against the policies of President Donald Trump.

Lamont poured more than $12 million of his own money into the hotly contest race.

He'd run for office before, losing bids for the Senate in 2006 and for governor in 2010.

Lamont's win completes a Democratic sweep of the top offices on the ballot in Connecticut, including the re-election of Sen. Chris Murphy

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9:25 a.m.

Democrats have regained control of the House from President Donald Trump's Republican Party in the midterm elections.

There was a revolt in the suburbs Tuesday against the GOP, and the political upheaval now threatens what's left of Trump's agenda.

But on Election Day, Republicans added to their edge in the Senate and prevailed in some key governor's race.

All in all, Republicans beat back the potential of big Democrat gains across the board. The "blue wave" that some feared never fully materialized.

The mixed verdict in the first nationwide election of Trump's presidency showed the limits of his hard-line immigration rhetoric in today's political landscape, where college-educated voters in the suburbs rejected his warnings of a migrant "invasion."

But blue-collar voters and rural America embraced his aggressive talk and stands.

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1:54 a.m.

Democrat Stacey Abrams says votes remain to be counted in the tight Georgia governor's race and vows to wait for them all.

Abrams told supporters at her election night party that they would "have a chance to do a do-over" in her race against Republican Brian Kemp, implying a runoff.

Kemp has a narrow lead in the vote count, but it was still possible the race could go to a runoff. In Georgia, a race goes to an automatic runoff if neither candidate receives more than 50 percent of the vote.

Early returns showed Kemp running up large margins across rural and small-town Georgia, but parts of metro Atlanta, where Abrams' strength is concentrated, had yet to report.

Some of those Atlanta-area counties had extended voting hours for some precincts to accommodate the crowds and compensate for problems.

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12:50 a.m.

President Donald Trump has called to congratulate Democratic House Leader Nancy Pelosi as her party stood on the brink of recapturing the House of Representatives.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the president made a series of calls while watching the election results late Tuesday.

Pelosi's spokesman Drew Hammill said Trump called Pelosi to congratulate her and to note her tone of bipartisanship.

Sanders says Trump also called Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell "to congratulate him on historic Senate gains."

Trump also called outgoing House Speaker Paul Ryan and Democratic Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer.

And he called several Republican winners for whom he campaigned in recent weeks, including incoming Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley, incoming Ohio governor Mike DeWine and incoming Florida Sen. Rick Scott.

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12:20 a.m.

Women will break the current record of 84 serving at the same time in the U.S. House.

With ballots still being counted across the country, women have won 75 seats and are assured of victory in nine districts where women are the only major-party candidates.

From the Women's March opposing President Donald Trump the day after he was inaugurated in January 2017 through a stream of sexual assault accusations later that year that sparked the #MeToo movement, outrage and organizing by women have defined Democratic Party politics this election cycle.

More than 230 women, many of them first-time candidates, were on the general-election ballots in House races.

Despite the gains, men will continue to hold the vast majority of House seats.

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12:15 a.m.

Democrats have picked up at least 23 House seats, putting them on track to reach the 218 needed to seize control from Republicans after eight years.

Democrats knocked off at least 17 GOP incumbents, picking up moderate, suburban districts across the country. Democrats won seats stretching from suburban Washington, New York and Philadelphia to outside Miami, Chicago and Denver. West Coast results were still coming.

Democrat Abigail Spanberger of Virginia defeated Republican incumbent Dave Brat in suburban Richmond to give Democrats the 23rd pickup.

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi is hailing "a new day in America."



 
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