Ala. governor signs chemical castration bill into law

The law requires the Alabama Department of Public Health to administer the treatment, which would reduce the production of testosterone or other hormones in the body. (Source: WSFA)
By  | 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (WSFA/Gray News) – Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey has signed into law a bill that requires anyone convicted of a sex crime with a child younger than 13 to undergo chemical castration as a condition of their parole.

Under the new law, a person required to undergo the chemical castration must begin the treatment no less than one month prior to their release from custody, and must continue treatment until the court determine it’s no longer necessary.

Rep. Steve Hurst, R-Calhoun County, sponsored the legislation and said last week it would help stop people from molesting children.

“People say this is inhumane. ‘How can it be any more inhumane than molesting a small child?’ Now that’s one of the most inhumane things there are," Hurst said.

The Alabama Civil Liberties Union, which came out against against the legislation, said mandating chemical castration could violate the U.S. Constitution’s 8th amendment, which forbids the use of cruel and unusual punishment.

The law requires the Alabama Department of Public Health to administer the treatment, which would reduce the production of testosterone or other hormones in the body.

“They really misunderstand what sexual assault is about. Sexual assault isn’t about sexual gratification. It’s about power, it’s about control," said Randall Marshall, the executive director with the ACLU of Alabama.

Ivey had been mum on whether she would support the legislation until ultimately giving it her approval on Monday, the final day for which she could sign bills into law following the legislative session.

Copyright 2019 WSFA 12 News via Gray Television Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Read the original story here.



 
The comment sections of our web set are designed for thoughtful, intelligent conversation and debate. We want to hear from the viewers but we are not obligated to post comments we feel inappropriate or violate our guidelines. Here are some of the criteria you should follow when posting comments:

Comments cannot be profane or vulgar. Children and families visit this site. We will delete comments that use profanity or cross the lines of good taste.

We will delete all comments using hate speech. Slurs, stereotypes and violent talk aren’t welcome on our web site.

Comments should not attack other readers personally.

We will delete comments we deem offensive, in bad taste, or out of bounds. We are not obligated to post comments that are rude or insensitive.

We do not edit user-submitted comments.

As a host WEAU 13 News welcomes a wide spectrum of opinions. However, we have a responsibility to all our readers to try to keep our comment section fair and decent. For that reason WEAU 13 News reserves the right to not post or to remove any comment.
powered by Disqus