UPDATE: Walker concedes defeat to Democrat Evers

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MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker has conceded defeat to Democrat Tony Evers.

Walker says he called Evers on Wednesday to concede defeat. The two-term Republican incumbent had held off conceding because the race was so close, but his campaign decided Wednesday there were not enough votes in play to change the outcome.

Based on unofficial results, Evers won by about 31,000 votes.

Walker says in a statement that he offered the full support of his staff and Cabinet to Evers as he begins the transition.

Walker had expressed concern about 2,000 absentee ballots in Milwaukee that had been reconstructed due to errors or damage. But Walker's campaign says in a statement that it determined there weren't enough votes in question to change the outcome of the race.

Evers is slated to be sworn into office Jan. 7.



MADISON, Wis. (AP) --Gov. Scott Walker's first comments since his election defeat are coming via Twitter, with the posting of a Bible verse.

Walker narrowly lost to Democrat Tony Evers in Tuesday's election. While Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch vowed there would be a recount, and his campaign spokesman raised concerns about damaged ballots, Walker has not been heard from.

But shortly before 9 a.m. Wednesday, Walker tweeted the Psalm "This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it."

Walker's father, Llew Walker, was a Baptist preacher who died in October.

Unofficial results show that Evers defeated Walker by just over 1 percentage point. Only candidates who lose by less than a point can request a recount.

Evers declared victory early Wednesday morning.



MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Republican Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is not conceding defeat to Democrat Tony Evers.

Unofficial results show Evers beat Walker by about 29,000 votes, or just over 1 percentage point, out of more than 2.6 million votes cast. State law only permits recounts for losing candidates who are within 1 percentage point.

Walker campaign spokesman Brian Reisinger says "we need the official canvass and for military ballots to be counted before any decision can be made."

Just before the race was called for Evers, Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch told supporters to prepare for a "long, drawn-out recount."

The race is the closest for Wisconsin governor since 1962 when the outcome was within 1 percentage point.


Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's campaign is alleging that "thousands of ballots were damaged and had to be recreated" in the election that saw Democrat Tony Evers score a narrow victory.

Walker campaign spokesman Brian Reisinger says until the ballots can be examined, there is no way to judge their validity.

Reisinger also says that Walker wants to see the official canvas of the vote and for military ballots to be counted "before any decision can be made."

Counties have until 9 a.m. Tuesday to canvas the vote.

While Walker looked for a way to escape the loss, Democrats exalted.

Evers told exuberant supporters at a Madison theater that he was "confident" in saying, "I'm going to be the next governor of the state of Wisconsin."